Best Filter for 30 gallon Aquarium: Penn Plax Cascade Canister VS AquaClear Power

It is not easy to consider the best filter for 30 gallon aquarium, which is to maintain the cleanliness of your tank, provide adequate filtration and take less effort to clean the tank.

A fish tank needs to have proper filtration in order for the good water condition, the health and survival of the fish.

However, there are many types of these products on the market, so choosing one can be confusing for beginners, who do not have any experience in buying filters for 30 gallons tank.

The following is about two filers for 30 gallons tank that we want to recommend for you: Penn Plax Cascade Canister Filter VS AquaClear Power Filter.

#1 Water-flow rate

The Water-flow rate is the amount of water that the fish tank filter can move every single hour. It is very important to check the flow rate since it will determine how efficient the filter is.

For 30 gallons tank, it is better to get a filter that can be able to move at least 3 times all the water of the tank in one hour. That means 30 gallons tank should have a filter can process at least 90 gallons water per hour.

Penn Plax is an ideal filter for any 30 gallons with a flow rate of 115 GPH. So it can filter the entirety water of 30 gallons tank for almost 4 times per hour. AquaClearn has a flow rate of 200 GPH, which means it can filter 7 times of the tank per hour.

These two filters also come with the flow rate control valves. This allows users to set the flow rate at the ideal filtration level for your fish and your tank. You will not have to worry if the flow rate is too strong for your fish.

#2 Filtration process

Ideally, you should get the filters that offer three filter media. They are mechanical, biological and chemical filtration. Each filter media produce its own filter effect that can help your keep the cleanliness of the tank, remove harmful chemicals and support the colonization of good bacteria.

Penn Plax includes 3 filter media above. Floss pad is used to remove any particular that contained in the water, and a coarse sponge that provides an abundant surface for encouraging bacterial growth.

AquaClear also engages in all 3 major types of filtration. It is featured with Aqua Clear Foam, Activated Carbon and BioMax and Cycle Guard for continuous biological filtration.

#3 Easy to install and use

If you do not have much experience with the tank filters, so you should choose the easy-to-install device. The drawback of Penn Plax Filter is that it is Canister filter so it will take your space inside the tank and reduce the living space of your fish.

However, it has an easy off the top and easy to handle tubing. Penn Pax also easy to use, you just need to push a button to control this device.

AquaClear is the hang on back filter that means it will not take any space inside your tank. This device also comes with a few pieces that you will need to put together. It may take you some effort to install, but due to this feature, it also easier to clean and maintain.

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Best Reptile Humidifier: Aiicioo Upgrade Reptile Humidifier VS Coospider Reptile Fogger

The reptiles require high humidity levels in their habitat. Some reptiles even need 80 to 90 percent humidity. You may have to maintain the humidity level in a reptile cage daily.

It is where reptile humidifier comes to handle. The best reptile humidifier will help reptile keeper avoid some problems in reptile’s shedding process, respiratory issues and dehydration.

This post is the detail about two popular reptile humidifiers that you should consider: Aiicioo Upgrade Reptile Humidifier Fogger VS Coospider Reptile Fogger.

#1 Capacity

The humidifiers will come with a large reservoir tank, where it takes the water and create the fog. Getting the humidifier with the larger capacity tank means that the humidifier will operate for longer before it needs to be refilled.

Both Aiicioo and Coospider humidifiers come with the tank capacity of 3 litters. They will provide a high output of cool mist. With this larger capacity, these tow humidifiers allow you to use it for a long period of time. It can run for 3-4 days without the need to refill depends on the amount of mist.

#2 Control the mist output

Different reptiles will require different humidity and moisture levels. These humidity levels also change in different periods of a reptiles lifetime. Therefore, it is better to get the device that can be able to adjust the misting setting.

Luckily, both Coospider and Aiicioo come with this feature.  You can easy to control the mist output by a rotary button on the front of the devices.

These two humidifiers also provide up to 380 ml/hour. However, ensure that you know the humidity level that your reptiles need.

#3 Maintenance

While these two humidifiers come with the same features, Coospider still scored higher than Aiicioo since Coospider will take less effort of maintenance. Some users complain that Aiicioo humidifier suddenly not works sometimes and if it happened, you will need to clean the water in the flexible hose and try again.

Another problem is that may Aiicioo may stop working after one month of using, then the fogger generator might be blocked by the impurities that are contained in the water. You will have to clean the Aiicioo humidifier with a clean cloth and try again.

Coospider seems to be more durable than Aiicioo. However, some users realized that if the hose kink, then the water will drip out and leak.

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Mallard (Anas platyrhynchos)

Northern Hemisphere’s most abundant duck. Mallards are one of the marsh or dabbling ducks. They feed by dabbling the surface or by upending. Sometimes they feed on land.


Seven ducks showed up as small ducklings waddling up a driveway with no adult duck and no water in the vacinity. They were raised at the NPWRC center. Photo taken 8/6/00.


A full sized lake at last! The seven ducks were released at a private lake with plenty of vegetation for the them to eat. The ducks never had enough room to fly while at the center, but as a final good-bye, one of the ducks flew around the lake and landed beautifully on the water, just as though flying had always been part of its daily routine.

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Striped Skunk (Mephitis mephitis)

These skunks dwell in deserts, woodlands, grassy plains, suburbs across most of the U.S. and southern Canada.

Photo taken 5/4/03.
This tiny skunk was found near a newly constructed home.

Photo taken 5/4/03.
The skunk is growing. It will soon be put in an outdoor enclosure.

Photo taken 5/18/03.
The skunk stomps its feet as a warning before it sprays.

Photo taken 5/18/03.
Photo taken 5/18/03.

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Cottontail

Desert Cottontail (Sylvilagus audubonii)

Buff-brown above white below. Slightly larger, with longer hind legs and longer tail than a Brush Rabbit. It eats grasses, mesquite, other green plants, bark, twigs and cactus. It’s range is up to 15 acres for males and 9 acres for females. It can climb sloping trees. It does not usually rest in “forms” (shallow depressions in the ground), but, it sometimes rests in burrows of other animals when the vegetation is sparse.

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Scrubjay

Scrub Jay (Aphelocoma coerulescens)

Lives in a variety of brushy areas including chaparral, open woodlands and residential areas. There is some geographical variation in color patterns. The upperparts including wings and tail are blue, the back is grey or brownish depending on the area, and the underparts are grayish white with a blue incomplete necklace.
Photo taken 6/8/02.


Birds mature quickly. Look at the difference two weeks makes in this Scrub Jay. It was moved to an outdoor habitat where it learned how to fly and then the Scrub Jay was released.

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Nightheron

Black-crowned Night-Heron (Nycticorax nycticorax)

 

Small, stocky, short-billed, short-necked, and short-legged when compared to other herons, egrets and bitterns. Most active at night, roosts during the day. Occupies various wetland habitats including marshes, wooded swamps and forests along rivers and streams. The adult has a black cap and back, pale gray wings, whitish underparts and a red eye. Juveniles are gray-brown with spots and streaks.

This Black-crowned Night-Heron had a broken wing that was starting to mend incorrectly. After surgery and rehabilitation, it was released on private property where there is a stream that has plenty of fish and frogs for it to eat.

 

 

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House Finch (Carpodacus mexicanus)

The male’s head, throat and eyebrows are orange to deep red that blends into a streaked buff-brown belly and flanks. The female is greyish-brown with darker streaking. House Finches are the most abundant birds living near humans in suburban areas of the West.

Photo taken 6/17/01.
There are 5 House Finches in this family. They are learning to eat seeds and to perch on twigs. Currently, they prefer to sit on each other or in their water dish.

Photo taken 6/17/01.
These House Finches were successfully released in the area where they were originally found.

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We care for the injured and orphaned wildlife of San Benito County

 

Nan Pipestem Wildlife Rehabilitation Center is a nonprofit organization that operates solely on funds from public donations and fundraisers. We get NO funds from any governmental origin. All the people working for the center are volunteers, with the exception of the Director of Animal Care, Meredith Day, who became the Director after Meredith Pipestem retired. The Director is responsible for the medical treatment and hands on care of the animals that come to the center. There are five other trained Animal Care technicians, all of whom are volunteer assistants and follow the prescribed treatments decided upon by Meredith and the attending Veterinarians.

Bobcat

The mission of NPWRC is:

  • REHABILITATE – to successfully rehabilitate injured wildlife and raise orphans, retaining their wild state
  • RELEASE – to return the animals to their natural habitats
  • EDUCATE – to teach the public in how to help prevent injury, preserve wildlife, and to appreciate the ecological value of every species

Bobcat

Rehabilitating wildlife is a very serious matter for us. We cannot release animals that will come up to people to beg for food. The animals need to be self-sufficient and live their lives in the wild with as little human contact as possible, or they risk getting injured or killed. Therefore, the animals in our care need to have as little contact with people as possible. We cannot run a petting zoo and expect to release animals into the wild that will fear and avoid humans.

FEAR OF HUMANS IS NECESSARY FOR SURVIVAL

Even with all the precautions that rehabilitators took with the California Condors, you probably have heard how the condors in the Grand Canyon are not afraid of humans . One man shot and killed a condor that got too close to his campsite. Park officials are looking for ways to keep the birds from swooping down looking for handouts. They will try to train the condors to fear humans.

That is what we are striving for–to release wild animals that fear humans. If not, our deer will approach the hunter, our raccoons, opossums and skunks will become pests in your yard. We are serious about helping wild animals to be wild and free. For this reason, we cannot be open to the public. But do visit the animals on this website, where you will see the current residents as well as the ones that we have successfully released.

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Relocation

The Nan Pipestem Wildlife Rehabilitation Center is looking for a new site to house our facility.

We would like to thank Granite Rock for providing our facility since 1991, and to thank all of you for your support to help maintain that facility, but, in a recent and sudden turn of events, the site of our facility has been sold. We now find ourselves preparing for an unexpected move. This is the second time a relocation of this nature has occurred since our incorporation in 1980 and due to the magnitude of the task we need to find a permanent home.

The Wildlife Center is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit that has been providing medical care to the sick, injured and orphaned wildlife of San Benito County for over thirty-two years. Those three plus decades have been funded only through fundraisers and private donations, or to put it plainly, we exist only because of the kindness of our community and volunteers. We have been proud to serve our community and glad to help in the ways we are able; to provide animal care, wildlife conflict tips and advice, and offer wildlife information in general when the opportunity arises.

We are looking for a parcel between five and ten acres to meet our habitat space requirements. The main regulation we have to be mindful of is that our animal enclosures must be a distance of 100ft from where domestic animals have access. Ideally the site should include a dwelling for animal security purposes and because this vocation doesn’t keep regular 9am-5pm workdays. A barn is an especially significant source of utility to our cause. Outbuildings for our office and diet prep area would be beneficial, but if not available, we can build.

At this moment in time we are no longer able to accept new patients and the clock is ticking down to our imminent departure from our current location. Each animal that needs our care is being transferred outside of our county so its needs can be met. Our gratitude to the dedicated hands they are being received by is immeasurable, but not all wildlife can be transferred across county lines due to regulations.

We have a place in our county’s history because the community values the magnificence of the wildlife in this breathtaking place we are all lucky enough to steward. We believe it’s not just the beauty of the land that inspires our citizens to love it here, but the majesty of the creatures we meet upon it. It has been the work of many people together that has seen our cause through the decades. We are hopeful together we can ensure that the tradition of caring for our wild neighbors endures for future generations.

If you have property that you would like to donate or would like to make a contribution to our fund to purchase a suitable property, please contact the center at 831-628-3400 or by e-mail to [email protected]

A temporary fund has been established with the Community Foundation for San Benito County. If you would like to make a donation, make your check payable to the “Wildlife Center Relocation Fund” and mail to Community Foundation for San Benito County, 829 San Benito St., Suite 200, Hollister, CA 95023.

 

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